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VICTORIA ABRIL

is a despot of a kind, within her self-centered, self-obsessed search of the origin of her pain and rampage to eradicate the cause of it. Every step she takes is pre-evaluated, precisely calculated and orchestrated. She is not sinister but controlling. Why she didn't choose to protect her son when she could and should have has become the essence of her being, an enormous pain she is ready to kill for. All, so she can have a glimpse of being, feeling human again; which she manages for a moment, for an instant she succeeds in externalizing her deep emotions and then miraculously: tears fall down her cheeks. Only to brush them off instantly after, because Helena will never change. She is an anti-hero whose expectations and possibility to change is overpowered by the prison she has created for her self and the inevitability of the circumstances she finds her self in. No changing means suffering, a punishment she deeply feels she is deserving off for not being good enough mother to her diseased son Noah. She is a victim of her own making/ of her own terms, obliged to mourn silently.

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